World Bank: What Climate Change Means for Africa, Asia and the Coastal Poor

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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • A new climate report looks at likely impacts of present day, 2°C, and 4°C warming across Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and South East Asia.
  • It describes the risks to agriculture and livelihood security in Sub-Saharan Africa; the rise in sea-level, loss of coral reefs and devastation to coastal areas likely in South East Asia; and the fluctuating water resources in South Asia.
  • Turn Down the Heat warns that poor communities will be the most vulnerable to climate change.

As the coastal cities of Africa and Asia expand, many of their poorest residents are being pushed to the edges of livable land and into the most dangerous zones for climate change. Their informal settlements cling to riverbanks and cluster in low-lying areas with poor drainage, few public services, and no protection from storm surges, sea-level rise, and flooding.

These communities – the poor in coastal cities and on low-lying islands – are among the world’s most vulnerable to climate change and the least able to marshal the resources to adapt, a new report finds. They face a world where climate change will increasingly threaten the food supplies of Sub-Saharan Africa and the farm fields and water resources of South Asia and South East Asia within the next three decades, while extreme weather puts their homes and lives at risk.

A new scientific report commissioned by the World Bank and released on June 19 explores the risks to lives and livelihoods in these three highly vulnerable regions. Turn Down the Heat: Climate Extremes, Regional Impacts, and the Case for Resilience (Read it in IssuuScribdOpen Knowledge Repository) takes the climate discussion to the next level, building on a 2012 World Bank report that concluded from a global perspective that without a clear mitigation strategy and effort, the world is headed for average temperatures 4 degrees Celsius warmer than pre-industrial times by the end of this century.

Small number, big problem

Communities around the world are already feeling the impacts of climate change today, with the planet only 0.8 ºC warmer than in pre-industrial times. Many of us could experience the harsher impacts of a 2ºC warmer world within our lifetimes – 20 to 30 years from now – and  4ºC is likely by the end of the century without global action.

The report lays out what these temperature increases will look like, degree-by-degree, in each targeted region and the damage anticipated for agricultural production, coastal cities, and water resources.

“The scientists tell us that if the world warms by 2°C – warming which may be reached in 20 to 30 years – that will cause widespread food shortages, unprecedented heat-waves, and more intense cyclones,” said World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim. “In the near-term, climate change, which is already unfolding, could batter the slums even more and greatly harm the lives and the hopes of individuals and families who have had little hand in raising the Earth’s temperature.”

The report, based on scientific analysis by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research and Climate Analytics, uses advanced computer simulations to paint the clearest picture of each region’s vulnerabilities. It describes the risks to agriculture and livelihood security in Sub-Saharan Africa; the rise in sea-level, loss of coral reefs and devastation to coastal areas likely in South East Asia; and the fluctuating water resources in South Asia that can lead to flooding in some areas and water scarcity in others, as well as affecting power supply.

“The second phase of this report truly reiterates our need to bring global attention to the tasks necessary to hold warming to 2ºC,” said Rachel Kyte, the Bank’s vice president for sustainable development. “Our ideas at the World Bank have already been put into practice as we move forward to assist those whose lives are particularly affected by extreme weather events.”

Open Quotes

The scientists tell us that if the world warms by 2°C – warming which may be reached in 20 to 30 years – that will cause widespread food shortages, unprecedented heat-waves, and more intense cyclones. Close Quotes

Jim Yong Kim
President, World Bank Group
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Bill Moyers, Lawrence Lessig on Government Spying, Big Brother’s Prying Eyes

Full Show: Big Brother’s Prying Eyes

June 14, 2013

Whatever your take on the recent revelations about government spying on our phone calls and Internet activity, there’s no denying that Big Brother is bigger and less brotherly than we thought. What’s the resulting cost to our privacy — and more so, our democracy? Lawrence Lessig, professor of law and director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University and founder of Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society, discusses the implications of our government’s actions, Edward Snowden’s role in leaking the information, and steps we must take to better protect our privacy.

“Snowden describes agents having the authority to pick and choose who they’re going to be following on the basis of their hunch about what makes sense and what doesn’t make sense. This is the worst of both worlds. We have a technology now that gives them access to everything, but a culture if again it’s true that encourages them to be as wide ranging as they can,” Lessig tells Bill. “The question is — are there protections or controls or counter technologies to make sure that when the government gets access to this information they can’t misuse it in all the ways that, you know, anybody who remembers Nixon believes and fears governments might use?”

Few are as knowledgeable about the impact of the Internet on our public and private lives as Lessig, who argues that government needs to protect American rights with the same determination and technological sophistication it uses to invade our privacy and root out terrorists.

“If we don’t have technical measures in place to protect against misuse, this is just a trove of potential misuse…We’ve got to think about the technology as a protector of liberty too. And the government should be implementing technologies to protect our liberties,” Lessig says. “Because if they don’t, we don’t figure out how to build that protection into the technology, it won’t be there.”

“We should recognize in a world of terrorism the government’s going to be out there trying to protect us. But let’s make sure that they’re using tools or technology that also protects the privacy side of what they should be protecting.”

A former conservative who’s now a liberal, Lessig also knows that the caustic impact of money is another weapon capable of mortally wounding democracy. His recent book, Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress — and a Plan to Stop It, decries a pervasive “dependence corruption” in our government and politics that should sound a desperate alarm for both the Left and the Right. Here, Lessig outlines a radical approach to the problem that uses big money itself to reform big money-powered corruption.

Producer: Gail Ablow. Editor: Rob Kuhns.
Intro Producer: Robert Booth. Intro Editor: Paul Desjarlais.
Photographer: Alton Christensen.

Lawrence Lessig on Government Spying.

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Photo of Aaron Swartz and Lawrence Lessig at t...

Photo of Aaron Swartz and Lawrence Lessig at the launch party for Creative Commons at O’Reilly’s Emerging Technology Conference. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

"Technology has exceeded our humanity"

“Technology has exceeded our humanity” (Photo credit: Toban B.)

Change the world by changing yourself? Eating less, anti-aging!

My grandmother often said, “You are what you eat.”

Here is the science to back this up, a video by

Dr. Michael Mosley. A Junk food addict!

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“I changed my diet 18 years ago.

I love to eat,

just not meat!

I was getting that ‘chunky’ middle age body,

so I fasted! And the FAT never returned.

Also…I have not seen a doctor for ANY illness since!” 

                                                         D.A. Hartley

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DSCN7668

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I hope that you watch this video,

it just recommends a baby step, no radical diet,

but watching this could help you live a healthy life.

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Reaching the ripe old age of 50, Dr. Mosley wondered how healthy

he really was. He found that he was only slightly overweight,

BUT

pre-Diabetic,

pre-Cancerous (6 types of cancer),

pre-Heart Disease.

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THE ARTICLE…

What did cavemen really eat when they sat down to dine, morning, noon and night?

The Paleo Diet guys spun some interesting theories —

all of which turned out to be nonsense.

But the truth is, if you’re trying to isolate the “health key” to early man’s diet,

it really may hinge not so much on what he was eating.

Because one BIG health benefit early man had going:

he rarely got three squares a day.

In fact, it might have regularly been a day or two

(or four) between filling meals back in the bad old days.

So if you get a hankering to emulate cavemen, the key is probably this:

eat a fair amount less than you’re eating now.

This is the basic tenant arrived at when a leading British journalist and physican,

Michael Mosley, set out to become healthier and lose weight,

while making as few changes as possible in his life.

Dr. Mosley is considered the “Sanjay Gupta of England,”

and today we are recommending a video he recently produced on this subject.

Rachel Maddow: Exxon turns to paper towels for oil spill clean up!

The Rachel Maddow Show (TV series)

The Rachel Maddow Show (TV series) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

LINK TO THE RACHEL MADDOW SHOW FEATURING EXXON MOBILE CLEANUP WITH PAPER TOWELS!

http://video.msnbc.msn.com/the-rachel-maddow-show/51473926

More Links:

RE BLOGGED FROM

Sunset Daily 6:41 PM on April 8, 2013
Tags: Andy Rowell, , Lake Conway, Mayflower, , Tar Sands Blockade

Exxon’s Paper Towel Clean Up….Don’t Worry About The Keystone Pipeline or any Oil Spills on land because the Great Way Exxon Cleans Up Oil Spills on land / marshes is to use Paper Towels and I am NOT joking by any means of that sentence…i Have a picure of it and I saw video footage of it a few seconds ago…..NOT NORMAL…these people plunder the earth just to make boat loads money at huge profits….and i get that corps are people too…but then what about morals like in individuals…..

Birds killed as a result of oil from the Exxon...

Birds killed as a result of oil from the Exxon Valdez spill. Photo courtesy of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

More about Chris Jordan and his film, Midway…

Chris Jordan’s message from the gyre

by criedy

I’ve been an admirer of Chris Jordan’s digital photographic art for several years now. HisRunning the Numbers series paints an unflattering portrait of American and global consumer culture that presents environmental messages in a fresh light. He creates images using repetition of familiar consumer items and waste, typically with an ironic twist. For example, below is his work ‘Whale‘ from 2011.

 

Whale, 2011 by Chris JordanWhale, 2011 by Chris Jordan

What at first glance seems to be a nice picture of a whale turns out to be something more sinister. The work is constructed (digitally) from 50,000 plastic bags, equal to the estimated number of pieces of floating plastic in every square mile in the world’s oceans. The website allows you to zoom in to see the individual plastic bags, as shown in the view below of the whale’s eye. It’s a sad indictment on the state of the Earth’s oceans.

 

Whale, 2011, detail by Chris JordanWhale, 2011, detail by Chris Jordan

On Midway Atoll, a remote cluster of islands more than 2000 miles from the nearest continent, the detritus of our mass consumption surfaces in an astonishing place: inside the stomachs of thousands of dead baby albatrosses. The nesting chicks are fed lethal quantities of plastic by their parents, who mistake the floating trash for food as they forage over the vast polluted Pacific Ocean.

For me, kneeling over their carcasses is like looking into a macabre mirror. These birds reflect back an appallingly emblematic result of the collective trance of our consumerism and runaway industrial growth. Like the albatross, we first-world humans find ourselves lacking the ability to discern anymore what is nourishing from what is toxic to our lives and our spirits. Choked to death on our waste, the mythical albatross calls upon us to recognize that our greatest challenge lies not out there, but in here.

~ Chris Jordan, Seattle, February 2011

In 2009, Jordan began travelling to Midway Atoll, in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, 2,000 miles from the nearest continent. What he found and photographed there is sickening. Inside the stomachs of dead baby albatrosses he found deadly plastic waste from human civilisation that had found its way even to this remote place.

The photographs he took are macabre and disturbing. These intimate portraits of death by plastic are strangely beautiful, yet behind each photograph is a story of pain and suffering that tears at your heart. I’ve included a selection of his photographs below.

Midway1
Photo from Midway by Chris Jordan
Photo from Midway by Chris Jordan
Midway3

 

Midway4
Midway5
Midway6

 

Midway7

Jordan is currently working on a film about his experiences on the island, called Midway. The trailer is below. I find it even more haunting than the images, because it shows the pain that lies unspoken in the photographs. If anyone ever doubts the impact that humans have on the Earth, show them this trailer and these images. Our civilisation brings death even to this remote part of the globe. We must find new ways to live with our beautiful planet that work with the Earth’s systems, not against them. For some people, this artwork will bring that message home more powerfully than words ever can.

 

 

The artwork Ben Franklin by artist Chris Jordan

The artwork Ben Franklin by artist Chris Jordan (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

Our Earth, Air and Water Pollution Affects All Life…Midway, a film by Chris Jordan.

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST. trailer; about; donate; blog

www.midwayfilm.com –

about-text-img-v1

Midway Film

P.O.Box 1424

New York, NY 10276

ReBlogged: Published on Feb 18, 2013, from 

“This video is about an island in the ocean at 2000 km

from any other coast line.

Nobody lives,

only birds and yet,

you will not believe what you will see here.

Please don’t throw anything into the sea.

Unbelievable, just look at the consequences.”

Bill Moyers…Democracy for Dollars…Congress 2012

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US journalist and commentator Bill Moyers